Touring Production

Macbeth (Tour 2015)

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Annie Lareau

On tour across Washington State

 

Macbeth TourThis taut, pared-down play tells a tale of murder and dark ambition. A ruthless lord seizes power with the help of his scheming wife and a trio of other-worldly witches. Urged on by eerie prophesies and ambitious desire, Macbeth slices through kinsmen, friend and foe in a bloody climb to power at any cost.

Performs at: Available for bookings in schools and community centers across Washington State. Please contact us for booking details.

Running Time: 90 minutes

 

Public Performance: Sunday March 29 at 7:30 PM

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Touring Production

Romeo and Juliet (Tour 2015)

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Annie Lareau

On tour across Washington State

 

Romeo and JulietIn the midst of an historical bitter feud, passionate young love emerges. Defying their parents, Romeo and Juliet marry and plot to run away together, only to be thwarted at every turn. This classic play is a swashbuckling drama and the greatest love story ever told.

 

Performs at: Available for bookings in schools and community centers across Washington State. Please contact us for booking details.

 

Running Time: 90 minutes

Othello

By William Shakespeare
Directed by John Langs
Performed at the Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center

 

Military leader Othello passes over his ensign, Iago, for a promotion in favor of young Cassio. Seeking revenge, master manipulator Iago seeds Othello’s mind with mistrust for his new bride Desdemona. The lies spread like wildfire clouding Othello’s vision for what is true and what is false. The flame of jealousy fills him with self-doubt, destroying his once-happy marriage. With soaring language and psychological depth, Shakespeare creates a highly charged tale that roars to a crashing conclusion.

 

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Tartuffe

By Moliere
Directed by Makaela Pollock
Performed at the Center Theatre at Seattle Center

 

Orgon’s household is under the influence of a seductive swindler named Tartuffe. This cunning con man, masquerading as a holy man, plans to dupe the gullible Orgon out of his fortune, his daughter, and his reputation. The pious grifter can do no wrong in his host’s eyes, yet everyone else in the household smells a rat. Just when the jig is up, Tartuffe ups the stakes and the charm. Moliere’s laugh-out-loud funny tale of deception, hypocrisy, and power shish-kabobs false morality.

 

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Measure for Measure

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Desdemona Chiang
Performed at the Center Theatre at Seattle Center

 

Left to clean up a city rampant with corruption, Angelo lays down the law sentencing a young man, Claudio, to death for impregnating his own girlfriend Juliet before marriage. Angelo’s particular moral weaknesses surface when Claudio’s sister, Isabella, a novice nun, pleads for her brother’s life. For Angelo, Isabella’s beauty and piety hold an erotic charm and he presents her with a shocking proposition. How far will Isabella go to save her brother’s life?  Who has true authority to judge another? Shakespeare offers no easy answers in this dark comedy of desires.

 

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Twelfth Night

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Jon Kretzu
Performed at the Center Theatre at Seattle Center

 

Love lost. Love found. Love turned upside down. Shakespeare’s sparkling comedy turns desire on its ear when shipwrecked twins Viola and Sebastian roam Illyria stirring up attraction and distraction wherever they go. Orsino loves Olivia, but she pays him no mind. Olivia loves Viola, whom she’s mistaken for a boy. Viola loves Orsino, and he has no idea she’s a girl. Toby Belch, Andrew, Feste and Maria love playing pranks on Malvolio who is in love with love (and himself). Strange romance gives way to a miracle in this rollicking comedy of misplaced longing.

 

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  • Design Team: Andrea Bryn Bush (Set Designer), Christine Meyers (Costume Designer), Kent Cubbage (Lighting Designer), Harry Jamieson (Sound Designer), Marleigh Driscoll (Props Designer), Peter Dylan O'Connor (Fight Choreographer), Wade Madsen (Movement Choreographer), Susannah  Butler (Stage Manager).

     

    Cast (in alphabetical order): Julie Briskman (Maria), J. Samuel Cowan (Ensemble), Mike Dooly (Sir Toby Belch), Spencer Hamp (Ensemble), Drew Highlands (Ensemble), Elinor Gunn (Olivia), Christopher Morson (Sebastian), George Mount (Andrew Aguecheek), Jay Myers (Orsino), Conner Neddersen (Feste), Allie Pratt (Viola), David Quicksall (Malvolio), Joey Shaw (Antonio).

  • Duke Orsino loves the Countess Olivia, but she is quite uninterested in him. Viola and her twin brother, Sebastian, have been separated in a shipwreck on the coast of Illyria. Certain that he has died, she dresses as a boy, and assuming the name Cesario, enters the service of Duke Orsino. The Duke is impressed by the “young man” and sends him to woo Olivia for him. Olivia dismisses the duke’s suit and falls madly in love with “him” herself. Meanwhile, Viola realizes that she is in love with the duke.

    The Countess Olivia employs a steward called Malvolio, who is a highly principled puritan. Her drunken uncle, Sir Toby Belch, and his friend Sir Andrew Aguecheek seize every opportunity to make fun of him. They are assisted by Feste, Olivia’s clown, and Maria, her maid.

    Maria tricks Malvolio into believing that Olivia is in love with him. Olivia, thinking that he has gone quite mad, has him locked up.

    Sir Toby, who has been encouraging Sir Andrew to woo his niece, persuades the knight to challenge Cesario to a duel. Both are scared, and neither can bring himself to fight.

    Viola’s brother, Sebastian, has survived the shipwreck and arrived at Orsino’s court with his friend Antonio. Sir Andrew and Sir Toby, thinking he is Cesario, provoke him to a duel. They are amazed when they are soundly beaten. Olivia also mistakes Sebastian for Cesario and at last finds her advances warmly welcomed. Antonio is arrested by the duke on old charges of piracy and is forced to ransom himself.

    Olivia announces that she and Cesario are married. Orsino threatens to kill the boy for supplanting him in her affections. Finally Sebastian arrives, and it becomes clear that it is he who is married to Olivia. Cesario reveals himself to be Viola, and Orsino, who was attracted to her when she was a boy, now offers to marry her. Antonio is pardoned and Malvolio vows revenge on them all.

     

    Adapted from Shakespeare Genealogies by Vanessa James

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Waiting for Godot

By Samuel Beckett
Directed by George Mount
Performed in the Falls Theatre at ACT Theatre

 

A lonely tree at the junction of a dirt road, on a day indistinguishable from any other day, two vagabond souls anxiously wait for their appointed meeting. They bicker, wheedle, tease, ponder, wonder and hold fast to anything that will give them a cause to live until the next day. Samuel Beckett introduced us to Vladimir and Estragon when the world lived in fear of nuclear annihilation.  Since then these two clowns, as well as their fellow travelers Pozzo and Lucky, have helped us take one falteringly dangerous step after another into an unknown future.

 

  • Design Team: Craig Wollam (Scenic Designer), Doris Black (Costume Designer), Roberta Russell (Lighting Designer), Robertson Witmer (Sound Designer), Marleigh Driscoll (Properties Designer), Victoria Thompson (Stage Manager)

    Cast (in alphabetical order): Chris Ensweiler (Pozzo), Jim Hamerlinck (Lucky), Darragh Kennan (Estragon), Todd Jefferson Moore (Vladimir), Alex Silva (Boy)

  • Two friends, Vladimir (Didi) and Estragon (Gogo), meet near a tree.  They talk and it is revealed that they are there meeting someone named Godot. Didi and Gogo try to amuse themselves to pass the time, bantering, bickering, trying to recall old jokes. Gogo often wants to leave, but Didi always says they must wait for Godot.

    Their conversation is interrupted by Pozzo, a merchant, and his silent servant, Lucky.  Pozzo talks to Didi and Gogo about his travels while he eats lunch, which is torture for the hungry Gogo. Wanting to entertain his new friends, Pozzo commands Lucky to dance, which Lucky does awkwardly. Pozzo then tells Lucky to think. Lucky begins to speak, but his words quickly turn into mindless nonsense. He is only interrupted wheh Didi removes Lucky’s hat. Pozzo and Lucky leave, as Didi and Gogo wonder if they have met them before.

    A boy comes in with a message from Godot saying that he will come tomorrow. Didi and Gogo resolve to leave the tree and find shelter, yet make no attempt to do so.

    The next day, Didi and Gogo are at the same spot. Gogo says he slept in a ditch and was beaten, yet seems to be uninjured. Didi tries to talk to Gogo about the previous day’s events, but he can’t recall them at first. As they wait for Godot, they play games and even pretend to be Pozzo and Lucky.

    Pozzo and Lucky appear. Pozzo is blind and cannot remember meeting them yesterday. His arrogance is gone, and he seems to be in utter despair. Lucky eventually leads him away, and Gogo goes to sleep. The same boy from the day before enters and informs Didi that Godot will not come today but will tomorrow.  Desperate, Didi begs the boy for more, but the boy has no memory of talking to him before. He exits, and Didi and Gogo sit at the tree to wait. They mull over the idea of killing themselves and resolve to bring some rope tomorrow in case Godot doesn’t appear. They keep on waiting.

    .

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Julius Caesar

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Vanessa Miller
Performed in parks throughout the Puget Sound region

An all-female version of this swift and enthralling political thriller portrays the life-and-death struggle for power in Rome. Fearing that a charismatic leader’s ambitions threaten the fragile state of affairs, a group of leaders plot to assassinate him. Caesar’s death sends the city into chaos, creating factions of power alliances. This striking examination of power’s intoxicating effects will leave you breathless.

  • Design Team Craig B. Wollam (Scenic Designer), Kelly McDonald (Costume Designer), Evan Mosher (Sound Designer), Christian Duhamel (Composer/Music Director), Robin Macartney (Properties Designer), Crystal Dawn Munkers (Choreographer), Gordon Carpenter (Fight Choreographer)

    Cast (in alphabetical order) Tonya Andrews (Soothsayer), Suzanne Bouchard (Brutus), Aimée Bruneau (Decius/Citizen), Rebecca M. Davis (Cinna/Citizen), Therese Diekhans (Julius Caesar), Karen Jo Fairbrook (Marellus/Metellus Cimber), Macall Gordon (Flavius/Trebonius), Heather Hawkins (Calpurnia/Cinna the Poet/Citizen), Meg McLynn (Portia/Octavius/Secret Service/Citizen), Victoria McNaughton (Citizen/Antony Aide), Sarah Russell (Citizen/Octavius Aide/Publius), Melissa Slaughter (Citizen/Caesar Aide), Amy Thone (Cassius), Nikki Visel (Lepidus/Secret Service), Kayla Walker (Lucius/Citizen), Terri Weagant (Marc Antony), and Kate Witt (Casca/Citizen)

  • It is the feast of Lupercalia, and the great general Julius Caesar is publicly offered the crown of Rome by his protégé and distant kinsman, Marc Antony. Caesar refuses it, but his power and popularity are a source of concern to several prominent citizens. A rival general, Cassius, particularly envies him, and in the name of the Republic he encourages his friends and relatives to plot Caesar’s assassination. They persuade Cassius’s brother-in-law Brutus, whom Shakespeare casts as a person of unassailable principle, to join the conspiracy and thus lend legitimacy to their scheme.

    Caesar is told by a soothsayer to beware the ides of March but carelessly ignores the warning and attends the Senate on that fated day. The conspirators surround him and each one stabs him until he dies, including Brutus, who delivers the final wound.

    Cassius now wants to kill Caesar’s friend Marc Antony, but Brutus persuades him to let him live and even to permit him to speak at Caesar’s funeral. Antony’s power as an orator quickly wins over the huge Roman crowd, who vow to help him avenge his friend’s death. The young Octavius Caesar, great-nephew to Julius, joins forces with Antony, and together with an older statesman, Lepidus, they form an alliance against the conspirators. Brutus and Cassius flee the city and assemble an army at Philippi. The night before the battle, Brutus is haunted by Caesar’s ghost. In battle, Cassius is too ready to believe they are defeated. Both men commit suicide unaware that the conflict is going in their favor. Octavius, Antony, and Lepidus are left to form an uneasy triumvirate.

    Adapted from Shakespeare Genealogies by Vanessa James

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AEC v1.0.4

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

By William Shakespeare
Directed by David Quicksall
Performed in parks throughout the Puget Sound region

 

Best pals Valentine and Proteus find themselves rivals for the affections of the beautiful Silvia while Julia, Proteus’ forgotten gal, hatches a plan to win back her man. As the two gents play out their foolish ideas of love, their servants Speed and Launce create a comic contest of their own in a hilarious battle of wits. This mid-century take on the impulsive nature of romance will win your heart.

 

  • Design Team: Craig B. Wollam (Scenic Designer), Jocelyne Fowler (Costume Designer), Music Dwight Beckmeyer (Director/Arranger), Harry Todd Jamieson (Sound Designer), Marleigh Driscoll (Properties Designer), Crystal Dawn Munkers (Choreographer), Louise Butler (Stage Manager).

    Cast (in alphabetical order): Scott Ward Abernethy (Thurio/Quintet), Bridgid Abrams (Quintet/Outlaw), Kevin Bordi (Launce), Keith Dahlgren (Antonio/Host), Angelica Duncan (Julia), Jim Gall (Duke), Rachel Glass (Lucetta/Quintet/Outlawa), Eric Jensen (Eglamour/Panthino/Quintet/Outlaw), Jacob Livingston (Quintet/Outlaw), Miles Terwilliger Livingston (Crab), Jason Marr (Proteus), Carolyn Marie Monroe (Sylvia), Christopher Morson (Speed), and Conner Neddersen (Valentine)

  • Valentine and Proteus are childhood best friends living in Verona. Valentine is heading to Milan to serve at the Duke’s court. Proteus decides to stay in Verona because he has fallen in love. Valentine is scornful of his friend’s choice of love over adventure; however, as soon as he arrives at the Milan, he too falls in love — with Silvia, the duke’s daughter. Meanwhile, in Verona, Proteus is thrilled to receive a letter from his beloved Julia declaring her affections. But his happiness is short-lived when his father insists that he join Valentine in Milan. Julia decides to follow him.

    Back in Milan, Silvia has acknowledged her love for Valentine, but the duke has already selected a rich old man to be her husband. Valentine is delighted when Proteus arrives at court and confides his intention to elope with Silvia. He introduces Proteus to her, and Proteus instantly forgets Julia and falls for her himself. Proteus betrays Valentine’s secret to her father, who banishes Valentine from the city. Silvia sees through Proteus’s attempts to unseat her lover in her affections. One night he attempts to woo Silvia and Julia, who has disguised herself as his page, overhears him and is brokenhearted.

    Silvia escapes the court to follow Valentine, who has become the leader of a robber band. She is pursued and found by Proteus. When she refuses his love, he tries to rape her. He is prevented by the arrival of Valentine, who forgives his old friend for the assault and, in a burst of bizarrely misplaced generosity, offers his beloved to him as a sign of eternal friendship. At this point, Julia faints, revealing her disguise, and Proteus suddenly regains his old love for Julia. The duke arrives and is persuaded to let Valentine marry Silvia. Everyone seems remarkably happy and forgiving. Amusement is provided throughout by two very funny servants and a dog.

     

    Adapted from Shakespeare Genealogies by Vanessa James

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AEC v1.0.4

As You Like It

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Stephanie Shine

performed at the Center House Theatre at Seattle Center

 

Can true love prevail amidst warring brothers, a wicked duke, banished lovers and clever deceit? Multiple romances and Celtic magic set in the woodlands of Ireland play host to delicate melancholy, profound irony and delightful comedy. Shakespeare’s fine cast of characters is surpassed only by the fine cast of actors who play them.

 

PRODUCTION TEAM

John Kirschenbaum (Scenic Design), Ron Erickson (Costume Design), Timothy Wratten (Lighting Design), Katehe Balter (Properties Design), Sean Patrick Taylor (Music Director), Gordon Carpenter (Fight Director), Jennifer Havlin (Choreographer), Rod Pilloud (Stage Manager)

 

CAST (in alphabetical order)

William Bone (Adam), Susanna Burney (Phebe), Gordon Carpenter (Silvius/Charles), Daniel Chercover (Touchstone), Eric Ray Anderson (Duke Senior/Duke Frederick), Deborah Fialkow (Rosalind), Peggy Gannon (Audrey), Susan McIntyre (Celia), Todd Jefferson Moore (Jaques/ Le Beau), Alex Samuels (Oliver), Brian Claudio Smith (William), Paul Morgan Stetler (Orlando), Sean Patrick Taylor (Corin/Amiens).